Some Stray Inscriptions - (1) Runes on Standing Stone at Oykell Bridge; (2) on Bracket at Gleneagles; (3) on the Kindrochit Brooch; (4) the Atholl Motto; (5) Two Carved Stones of the Urquharts of Cromarty

W Mackenzie (Author)


Keyword(s):
Casket, Brooch, Wall
Period(s):
Palaeolithic

Abstract


The Oykell Bridge stone is proved to be a 19th-century fake, A bracket inserted in the interior of the entrance wall of a chapel depicts the arms of Haldane of Gleneagles impaled with Erksine. It probably records a marriage of 1518. The Kindrochit engraved silver-gilt brooch is interpreted as a love-token with a French inscription. The Atholl Motto at Balvenie Castle is re-interpreted as "Furth fortune and fill the ferter" where ferter is a small box or casket. The 17th-century slab and its link to the life of Sir Thomas of Urquhart is considered. The second slightly earlier slab was probably commissioned by his father.

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Published
30-11-1927
How to Cite
Mackenzie, W. (1927). Some Stray Inscriptions - (1) Runes on Standing Stone at Oykell Bridge; (2) on Bracket at Gleneagles; (3) on the Kindrochit Brooch; (4) the Atholl Motto; (5) Two Carved Stones of the Urquharts of Cromarty. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 61, 173-191. Retrieved from http://soas.is.ed.ac.uk/index.php/psas/article/view/7698
Section
Articles